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Curated research library of TV news clips regarding the NSA, its oversight and privacy issues, 2009-2014

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Primary curation & research: Robin Chin, Internet Archive TV News Researcher; using TV News Archive service.

Speakers

Barack Obama
President
KNTV 08/01/2014
Mitchell: After receiving a still-secret Senate report into the Bush CIA's post-9/11 interrogation, President Obama said today the United States tortured prisoners. Obama: In the immediate aftermath of 9/11, we did some things that were wrong. We did a whole lot of things that were right. But we tortured some folks. We did some things that were contrary to our values. Mitchell: the president banned waterboarding and other harsh techniques right after taking office.
John McCain
U.S. Senator (R-AZ),
KNTV 08/01/2014
Mitchell: Bush officials have always denied that waterboarding done at secret black sites, prisons in Poland and other cooperating countries, was torture. Senator John McCain himself tortured for years as a Vietnam P.O.W., says the long-awaited senate report leaves no room for debate. McCain: I think the evidence is very clear that waterboarding was used as a routine technique, which is the definition of torture. Mitchell: Still today the CIA's former top lawyer defends the practices. Rizzo: They were harsh. But I didn't think then and I don't think now that they constitute torture.
Dianne Feinstein
U.S. Senator (D-CA), Chairman of Senate Select Committee on Intelligence
KNTV 08/01/2014
Mitchell: That Senate report is described by some as dynamite. But tonight Intelligence Chair Dianne Feinstein is complaining that the White House, which has the final say on who gets -- what gets declassified and released to the public, cut too much out of it and she's not going to release it in its edited form. The fight continues.
Chuck Todd
NBC News Chief White House Correspondent
MSNBCW 08/01/2014
Todd: At least two democratic Senators, Mark Udall and Mark Heinrich are calling for the resignation of John Brennan. This is after the CIA inspector general found that agency officials improperly found their way into the senate computers during an investigation into the agency's interrogation techniques post-9/11.
John Brennan
Director of the CIA
MSNBCW 08/01/2014
Todd: According to unclassified summaries of the report that's going to come out next week, five agency employees, including two attorneys, improperly accessed or caused access to computers of the majority of the senate select committee on intelligence in March. Of course CIA Director John Brennan had vehemently denied that charge when it was first made a few months ago. Brennan: The facts will come out, but let me assure you that CIA in no way was spying on the SSCI or the Senate. Todd: Well, that was March. Now the CIA admits, yes, it was spying on the senate. And in a statement, quote, “The Director subsequently informed the SSCI Chairman and the Vice Chairman of the findings and apologized to them of such actions by CIA officers as described in the OIG report. But senators on both sides of the aisle on Thursday expressed outrage with the agency, calling on CIA leadership to repair trust with Congress, including Oregon democratic Senator Ron Wyden who demanded an apology from the CIA Director himself.
Ron Wyden
U.S. Senator (D-Oregon), Member of Select Committee on Intelligence
MSNBCW 08/01/2014
Wyden: The public deserves to know who is responsible for ordering and carrying out this unconstitutional act. And particularly I want to know whether Director Brennan deliberately lied to the American people. As you know, he told your network and others, Oh, the search is the furthest thing from what he would be interested in. I've long felt that with the intelligence leadership there is a culture of misinformation. This may be another example.
Ron Wyden
U.S. Senator (D-Oregon), Member of Select Committee on Intelligence
MSNBCW 08/01/2014
Wyden: It may take an independent counsel here, chuck. And let me tell you what I know at this point. If a 19-year-old hacker had searched Senate files this way, that hacker would be sitting in jail right now. Now, back in January I asked Director Brennan whether the Computer Fraud and Abuse Act applied to the CIA. That act has criminal penalties, and I think the Director owes the American people a public explanation.
Ron Wyden
U.S. Senator (D-Oregon), Member of Select Committee on Intelligence
MSNBCW 08/01/2014
Wyden: I want a public accounting at this point. I want to know who authorized this act. I want to know why they thought it was legal, and I want to know who is going to be legally held responsible. You've got to have the ability on our committee to get straight answers. And again and again, as you know, I asked Director Clapper at one point whether the government collected any type of information at all on Americans. They said no. We have another example here where Director Brennan's spokesperson said they had a strong interest in looking at these files and then Director Brennan told your Andrea Mitchell and various other networks they had no interest in it. The facts don't add up and this is part of the culture of misinformation.
Ron Wyden
U.S. Senator (D-Oregon), Member of Select Committee on Intelligence
MSNBCW 08/01/2014
Wyden: My sense from the very beginning is the agency wanted to do everything they could to play stall ball here. They don't believe that where the committee, in my view, is going to end up, with profoundly shocking and disturbing information that would be made public. They don't want that released. And so again and again they have thrown up one hurdle after another. And you asked about what's going to happen with Director Brennan. I think he's got some heavy lifting to do in order to establish his credibility again. As far as I'm concerned, this inquiry is going to have to run right to the top.
Ron Wyden
U.S. Senator (D-Oregon), Member of Select Committee on Intelligence
MSNBCW 08/01/2014
Wyden: Director Brennan is the one that I want to have inform the American people about whether he deliberately lied about this matter. He told your network and others that a search like this was the furthest thing from his mind. We now know that wasn't the case. He ought to explain to the American people whether he deliberately lied or just didn't know what his agency was doing.
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